Erotica publisher, author charged after manipulating book s…

Jana Koretko

An independent, small publisher and author has been charged with manipulating ebook sales data to defraud other authors.

It’s difficult enough for writers and authors to eek out an income from their hard work without this breach of trust taking place.

Source: Erotica publisher, author charged after manipulating book s…

The Amazon ‘Buy Button’ – why you should be very afraid if you’re an author or publisher…

 

On March 1, Amazon enacted a policy change that allows third-party sellers to compete for the Buy Box for books in “new condition.”

When you go to a product page on Amazon, the ADD TO CART Buy Box is the default offer. Other used options fall below the Buy Box. Where books are concerned, the default Buy Box has always belonged to the publisher. When you buy a book, Amazon pays the publisher 45% of the list price. This means your purchase is supporting the entity that published the book, namely the publisher, and authors are making a profit (albeit small) every time you buy because the publisher is paying an author royalty for each sale.

Now Amazon is giving that priority spot to third-party sellers… [go to source for more]

Source: http://www.ibpa-online.org/news/344366/Amazons-Buy-Button-Policy-Change-Hurts-Publishers-and-Authors.htm

Amazon made a small change to the way it sells books. Publishers are terrified. – Vox

It used to be that when you were shopping for a new copy of a book and clicked “Add to Cart,” you were buying the book from Amazon itself. Amazon, in turn, had bought the book from its publisher or its publisher’s wholesalers, just like if you went to any other bookstore selling new copies of books. There was a clear supply chain that sent your money directly into the pockets of the people who wrote and published the book you were buying.

But now, reports the Huffington Post, that’s no longer the default scenario. Now you might be buying the book from Amazon, or you might be buying it from a third-party seller. And there’s no guarantee that if the latter is true, said third-party seller bought the book from the publisher. In fact, it’s most likely they didn’t. [Visit source for more]

Source: Amazon made a small change to the way it sells books. Publishers are terrified. – Vox

Keyword Research Trends That Matter In 2017 | Semper Plugins

For authors and publishers, keywords are a vital tool to aid the visibility of your book on internet searches. Improving that among the millions of books out there is of paramount importance!

Despite what you’ve been hearing, keyword research isn’t dead. Without keywords, there is no SEO… right? Let’s look at the facts.

93% of online experiences in 2016 started with a search, and search starts with words. Keywords will remain relevant as long as people use words to interact with search engines. The only thing that has changed are the additional factors that have influenced how we use keywords for SEO.

The truth is that search engines are no longer looking only at keywords, but also value many other factors. Keywords are now just a miniscule part of the pie. That is not to say that keyword discovery isn’t important. In fact, it is important in the way you go about it: we need to go levels deeper – to the precise level that users are searching for; and search engines are indexing for.

This post will focus on the three main focuses of valuable keyword research in 2017:

(1) user intent
(2) long-tail keywords
(3) Google voice search….. read more

Source: Keyword Research Trends That Matter In 2017 | Semper Plugins

Keywords and book-selling. Yes it's still vital! Click To Tweet

bigwords101 — Punctuation and the Law

 

Close on the heels of the recent post about the Oxford comma (You can have my Oxford Comma when you pry it from my cold, dead, and lifeless hands) we highlight this blog by the Grammar Diva about our necessary friend, the comma, and how getting it wrong can lead to legal ramifications!

Last week the Oxford comma made big news: a Maine trucking company was forced to pay overtime after the lack of a comma in a law was interpreted in favor of the truckers. Here is the blog post that talks about that article.

I researched a bit and found that there are several famous stories where punctuation has been crucial to interpretation of a law.

First, there is the “comma defense.” Was it going to be life in prison or the death penalty for Clifford L. Robinson? The federal sentencing code reads, “. . . death or life in prison, or a fine or both . . .” A fine for murder?  Read more…

Source: bigwords101 — Punctuation and the Law

How Many Humans Actually See Your Online Book Ads?

It’s common practice today for publishers to buy online ads for promoting their books. The inexpensive cost and targeting capability make digital platforms, such as Google Adwords, Facebook Ads, and various high-traffic websites, seem like appealing choices. But, are real readers actually seeing the online book ads that publishers purchase? [more]

Source: How Many Humans See Your Online Book Ads

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Are Bookstores Making a Comeback? Sales Up 6.1% In First Half of 2016

For the first half of the year, bookstore sales were 6.1% ahead of the comparable period in 2015. According to estimates released by the U.S. Census Bureau, bookstores totaled $5.44 billion in the January-June 2016 span, up from $5.13 billion a year ago.

Bookstore sales in 2016 rose every month compared to 2015, including in June when sales increased 5.0% to…[more]

Source: Bookstore Sales Up 6.1% In First Half of 2016

Are Bookstores making a Comeback? 2016 Sales Soar! Click To Tweet

The Best Way to Get Blurbs for Your Books | She Writes

I get an inordinate number of questions about what the industry fondly calls “blurbs,” and here I attempt to cover them all with a detailed list of how authors can approach soliciting and choosing, and everything in between. In today’s book marketplace, blurbs still matter to publishers and the industry at large, in part because they’re a bit of a holdover from a bygone era and publishing is big on tradition, and in part because household names and big review outlets still carry a lot of prestige. The idea is simple. If you’re a fan of John Grisham and he blurbs a new legal thriller, you might be more inclined to give that new book a chance. But obviously most newly published authors today are not getting blurbed by household names or big review outlets. I’ve witnessed my own authors at She Writes Press agonizing over blurbs, while others seem to treat the whole endeavor like a sport. But by and large, whether the process of procuring blurbs comes easily or not, I see a lot of misconception about the blurb’s purpose and around the protocol of blurbing in general. So here’s my attempt to set a few things straight.…[more]

Source: An Author’s Guide to Praise and Endorsement Best Practices

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[SWP: Behind the Book] Fast-Track Advice for New Authors – She Writes

After two years and two novels published, I’d like to share my top tips for new authors, with the hope that my experiences will save you time and minimize stress! Feel free to comment and/or add your thoughts!

Good editorial advice is precious. The editorial process can be long and painful, but a good editor will skillfully fine-tune your story so it resonates with readers. When faced with… [more]

Source: [SWP: Behind the Book] Fast-Track Advice for New Authors – She Writes

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[THE WRITER’S LIFE] LEMONADE, ANYONE? When your books won’t sell

Everyone knows that you don’t pass up a kid’s lemonade stand. When you come upon a handmade sign, a wobbly card table and an icy pitcher of lemonade, you buy a cup. If the beverage looks a little sketchy, you don’t say, “no thanks, I’m not thirsty,” you say, “Yum. I think I’ll save this for later,” and you walk down the road a bit and pour it out behind a bush. Lemonade stands are not about thirst. You never, ever decline a cup.

Being an author is a little like having a lemonade stand; particularly if you’re doing a lot of the promotion and marketing yourself. You lug your card table and books and banners and bookmarks to whichever event is scheduled for that weekend; craft fairs, bookstores, library events, or conferences. You set up shop, hoping that the hundreds of people expected to attend will clean you out of your box of books and your pile of postcards. And sometimes I’ve seen that happen. To the guy next to me [more…]

Source: [THE WRITER’S LIFE] LEMONADE, ANYONE?