Some Things About Grammar for National Grammar Day, 4th March | bigwords101

March 4 is National Grammar Day! A whole day devoted to grammar . . . And here is our annual Grammar Day post.

Fifteen Things About Grammar

  1. Virtually every written human language has developed rules for its use.
  2.  Way back in ancient Greece, Plato and Aristotle were interested in language and can be blamed for helping form the foundations of the parts of speech.
  3.  Latin became the language of Western Europe during…

Source: bigwords101 — Some Things About Grammar for National Grammar Day

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Personanondata: Where are all the e-Textbook Users?

“I’ve been as guilty as anyone, speculating about the demise of print in the classroom. But a combination of institutional resistance, vested interest and simple disinterest have ultimately conspired to position digital textbooks on the slow train to never.  In fact, in a recent survey conducted by Campus Computing on behalf of the National Association of College Stores (NACS), “never” was the answer over 24% of respondents gave when asked when content in the classroom will be primarily digital.

Surveying faculty and students on the adoption of and/or readiness for academic digital content has become a competitive sport, resulting in regular reports presented by associations, trade groups and retailers.   You don’t need to look at many of these to spot the themes consistent to all:  Students prefer print, textbook cost is an issue and faculty isn’t inclined to experiment.”

Source: Personanondata: Where are all the e-Textbook Users?

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Bite Sized e-books are Taking the World by Storm

Do PIGEONHOLE, SERIAL READER, CRAVE,  and ROOSTER mean anything to you? If a growing trend has anything to do with it they soon will – they are all apps that allow readers to receive serialized novels.

Serialized fiction first gained prominence in Victorian England and first appeared in newspapers. It was practiced by such literary giants as Charles Dickens, Leo Tolstoy and Joseph Conrad.  It fell out of favor in the last fifty years, but is now making a rebound thanks to the iPhone.

Apple is showcasing two new e-reading apps under their new and notable category on the main App Store homepage…

Source: Bite Sized e-books are Taking the World by Storm

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Sorry, Science Says Speed Reading Doesn’t Work | Inc.com

Speed reading might sound like the perfect modern-day superpower. Unfortunately, it’s impossible.

There’s good reason to wish you could read faster. Not only do excellent book recommendations come out faster than you can note down the titles, more or less actually make it from cover to cover, but a host of highly successful people also insist that one of the surest routes to greatness is becoming an avid reader.

But don’t let the sensible wish that you could squeeze more reading into your busy life lead you to be seduced by the idea of speed reading. It sounds pretty close to a real-world superpower, but sadly, according to new science, it just isn’t possible.

Source: Sorry, Science Says Speed Reading Doesn’t Work | Inc.com

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